Canada’s Environmental Gamble: The Threat of Oil Supertankers

560 full time jobs versus potential ecological devastation: you decide what’s more important.

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January 16, 2013
Article from GRTV

Here’s the Situation:

There are three proposals to bring more and bigger oil supertankers to B.C.’s coast, so that Alberta’s oilsands crude can be shipped to China and Asia. If this is allowed to happen, most British Columbians would benefit little and B.C.’s resplendent coast would be threatened by oil spills. The Alberta and federal governments are pushing for these oil tankers. They’re using a review process that’s rigged in their favour. But B.C. has a history of defending its coast and an epic struggle is underway.

Enbridge Inc. wants to build two 1,100 km pipelines to Kitimat, B.C, where the oil would be loaded onto 225 tankers each year. These mega ships would then have to make their way through the narrow channels and fjords of the Great Bear Rainforest.

Kinder Morgan wants to expand its pipeline from the oilsands to Burrard Inlet. If their plan went ahead, every day an oil tanker would sail past Vancouver, Victoria and the Gulf Islands.

CN Rail wants to load oil onto trains to Vancouver or Prince Rupert. Tankers would sail through either B.C.’s north or south coast on their way to Asia.

Why We’re saying ‘no’:

You can’t eliminate and can’t predict oil spills. They happen because humans make mistakes and machines break.

A single oil spill could devastate lives, livelihoods, cultures and wildlife on our coast.

There’s no need to accept the risk. Far more jobs would be put at risk than created in B.C., and ramping up oilsands production to feed Asian demand is not in the national interest. Given that oil is a non-renewable resource, we think it should be used wisely and in the long-term best interests of Canadians.

What We Want:

To actually get the job done we’ve got three levels of government to work with. Rather than ask each of them to do exactly the same thing, political considerations lead us to think the clever way is to break things down into three puzzle pieces that when fitted together create victory for our coast.

Get Involved Now!

Progress: 142 MPs support a tanker ban on B.C.’s North Coast.

Goal: All 308

Sign the Petition Now!

Progress: 36 MLAs oppose the Enbridge Northern Gateway Project.

Goal: All 85

We Need Your Help

Progress: 20 of 119 affected local governments oppose proposals by Enbridge or Kinder Morgan.

Goal: All 119

We want the federal government to legislate a ban on crude oil tankers through Hecate Strait, Dixon Entrance and Queen Charlotte Sound. We want the government of British Columbia to support that measure, and we want them to use whatever provincial means are available to stop oil tanker expansion on the entirety of B.C.’s coast. We want B.C.’s local governments to pass motions that oppose oil pipeline and tanker expansions, while encouraging the provincial and federal governments to act.

How We Win:

By getting a majority of federal, provincial and local politicians on side. How do we get that? Basically, by building a really, really big network of people. The more people who sign the petition, the better we will be able to organize together and be successful.

To sign the petition:
http://dogwoodinitiative.org/no-tankers/learn-more

For more information, visit:
www.PipeUpAgainstEnbridge.ca
www.NoTankers.ca
www.TankerFreeBC.org
www.PacificWild.org

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One Response to Canada’s Environmental Gamble: The Threat of Oil Supertankers

  1. Pingback: Oil in Eden: The Battle to Protect Canada’s Pacific Coast | The Red Pill

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